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Thread: 3.8 Turbo Buick Celica

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    I was pretty happy with that setup for a while but had kinda maxed out it's potential HP wise and wanted more!
    So I started reading about another version of this Buick turbo motor, that was in the notorious 1986/ 87 Buick Grand National. Click image for larger version. 

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    From everything I had read, this engine was a beast, but it was fuel injected, intercooled, and computerized, and I new nothing about any of that. I was lucky enough to stumble across a Buick GN forum, and they had a great technical resource section, and there were a lot of guys on that site, that new the cars inside and out, so I just spent months reading as much as I could.
    I eventually made the plunge and managed to find a complete engine, with the computer and wiring harness. I tore the motor down, and freshened it up, and then had to see how it was going to fit. It basically bolted right in, except for issues with the passenger side exhaust manifold hitting the frame rail. so I had to notch the frame to get it to clear, and weld in a reinforcing plate.
    I also had an issue with finding a place to mount the intercooler and rad, because this engine setup ran an electric fan. I had to chop out the lower front portion of centre frame, and weld in some support plates, that lowered the opening to clear the intercooler, and reframed it below with some square tubing.
    The rad now had to be moved forward in front of the brace, so I had to fab up some brackets to hold it. If fact, everything that was fastened to the front portion of the car had to be moved forward by an inch to get the intercooler and rad to clear enough to fit an electric fan.
    Had to also lower the sway bar mounts, to clear the crank pulley, and change the height of the bar mount tubes, on the control arms.
    Also had to modify some of the steering u joint setup, to clear the DS exhaust manifold.
    Exhaust was another PIA because this new setup ran a exhaust downpipe off the turbo that was near the front side of the motor. Factory pipe wouldn't fit so one had to be fabricated from the turbo exhaust elbow and snaked down a small pathway past the passenger exhaust manifold, and leave enough room to be able to be able to access the spark plugs. Fun!!!
    Electrical was a nightmare! The wiring harness I got with the engine was burnt in spots, so the whole thing had to be unwrapped and gone over wire by wire! I remember having it laid out on a sheet of 4 x 8 plywood all opened up. I looked lie a spiders web. (I wish I could find the old pics of this.) Since a lot of the factory GN stuff wasn't going to be used in the Toyota, I removed a bunch of the wiring. I also shortened all the wiring because it was just way to long for my car. After what seemed like forever of tracing, cutting, soldering, heat shrinking, and re wrapping, it was done.
    I has to drill a hole in my firewall and feed it through to connect to the ECM. I then had to find a route through the engine compartment so it could connect to all the sensors and gauges.

    Sorry I cant post any pics of all this. I lost a lot of stuff during an old hard drive crash.

    More to come

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Got the rest of the exhaust figured out, and had to move on to fuelling. This engine required a hi pressure/volume fuel pump, so I went with and inline electric Holley. This system also required a return line to the tank, and I knew the tiny factory line wasn't up to the job, so I had to plumb new lines to the tank, and added some braided lines with some Russell fittings to connect to the engines fuel rail. I managed to make a mounting bracket for the fuel pump, and mounted a fuel filter, and hot wired the power to the pump. (hot wiring is taking the power directly off the alternator, for higher and more consistent voltage, rather than use the factory ECM tap. everything functions the same except for the voltage source)
    I then upgraded the front suspension with a set of coil overs, adjustable camber plates, and AGX adjustable shocks. Had to cut the spring hat of the old strut towers, and install the sleeves, and do a bit of messing around but eventually it was all setup. I also decided to add some air bags to the rear coils to help prevent some of the squatting.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Next came cooling. I now had to use an electric fan, and had to hunt down something that would fit my rad and fit in the space between the intercooler and the front of the engine/waterpump. I figured 2 x 10" fans should do the trick. I pulled them out of their plastic housings and mounted them on a metal brace that sat behind the rad. wired them up with a couple of relays, and tied in the wiring to the ECM so they would come on automatically at the preset temperature, and they worked fine,but didn't cool for nothing. (Sorry I cant find any pics of them, but they are still lying around in the garage. I use them in the summer for circulating fans. lol) I needed to make a fan shroud. Made one out of thin sheet metal hoping it would do the trick, but wasn't good enough to keep her cool on a warm day. Realizing that I needed a larger fan with more CFM I started hunting. Finally found a 15" PermaCool fan that fit and messed with the mounting brackets, and made new shroud for her, and cooling was a lot better, but not perfect. I them found a high flow water pump to replace the factory unit, and put on a overdrive pulley to get more flow at idle. I also read a lot about coolant additives. I came across this stuff called RMI-25 on a couple of diesel truck forums, and it got rave reviews for it cooling ability as well as it's cooling systems cleaning ability. You can run it as an additive to antifreeze, or mix it with straight distilled water for better cooling. Big difference! (And no I'm not a rep for, or sell this product.)
    Still wasn't perfect but I could at least drive it now with out fear of overheating on normal days.

    More to come

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Now having most of the big stuff out of the way, I started to tune or play with the engine. There were/are a couple of great Turbo Buick forums out there, so I joined them, asking a bunch of questions about how to tune the engine, and got some great info. Basically the first things you were to do was to improve the fuel pump and hot wire it, (already done) and swap out the old non adjustable fuel pressure regulator for an adjustable one.Click image for larger version. 

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    Next was to upgrade the ECM chip from factory stock to a good aftermarket chip. Back then there were only a few good chip guys out there, and stuff was still being pioneered, so I decided to try burning my own chips. I bought a cheap programmer and eraser Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	15311 and started to do a lot of reading, and asking a lot of questions. I made a couple of versions that worked pretty good, but realized my ability to write code was limited, and ended up buying a chip from one of the gurus. Really woke the car up, and it started and idled way better than before.
    After that, was to to make the turbo wastegate rod adjustable so I could up the boost from the factory 13-14 lbs.Name:  100x75_TA Wastgate Actuator 1.jpg
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    Now the car was getting scary!!!
    As crazy as it sounds, it also was becoming a PIA in the ass to drive with the 5 speed. The Turbo Buick motor has an almost flat torque line, and isn't a high rev motor. 5100 Rpm was about it, but the torque kicked in early and hard. You can see what I mean from the dyno graph (not mine ) Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	15314 If I wanted to get into it, banging gears just blew the tires off, or started smoking the clutch, and going around corners while shifting trying not to get into any boost was not very fun. Also having the boost die while I got off the throttle to shift, and hit again after wasn't great for the turbo, or for making the car quicker. I know many will say I should have bought a blow off valve, they work great on the imports, but as I said, this engine is a very different low rev beast. The Grand National came with a factory 200-4R transmission, and no doubt the engineers who designed this whole drivetrain, had spent a lot of time figuring out what would work the best, so I swapped out the 5 speed for an auto tranny, and never regretted it.
    The GN 200-4R was a bit of a different setup from the ones found in your run of the mill daily drivers. "They had different valve body, springs, governor, separator plate, shift valves, boost valve, check balls in different locations. Basically the calibration of the whole transmission and shift points are special to the Grand National. This is on purpose because the early torque the Buick engine creates will slip and fry the clutches of a non-Grand National (BRF) transmission."
    I had to now make another driveshaft, but opted to be safe and have a custom one made with HD Spicer U joints, from driveshaft shop.Click image for larger version. 

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    I was now regretting some of the stuff I had cut out of the wiring harness earlier (transmission plug) and had to add a bunch of wiring to get the torque converter lockup solenoid , and gear position sensors to work. I also had to add a VSS and wiring (vehicle speed sensor) to the speedo cable. All this stuff was now needed to get the ECM to work properly. Had to mess with making a new transmission cross member support, but incorporated a driveshaft loop into it for safety.
    Now I just had to point the car and hold on to the steering wheel!!! It was a day and night difference from the 5speed to the auto. The car just pulled and pulled, shifts were nice and smooth, and the boost just built and stayed. The car was much quicker now.

    More to come

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Having an externally mounted electric fuel pump created a annoying whine all the time, so I decided to go to an intank setup. I thought about adding a fuel cell, but really wanted to keep the original fuel tank, so I decided to cut open my tank and fabricate something.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I had gone to the wreckers and found a tank with a large fuel level sender, and cut that part out of it so I could use the attachment plate setup. You can see in the pic above the smaller hole is for the stock fuel level sensor, and it was too small to try and fit in the new pump and filter sock, so I cut a larger hole in the tank, and transferred the larger ring to it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The pump is a Walbro 340 that flows 255 LPH. I then bent some steel tubing to attach the pump to, and a return line, and brazed it into the cap. added a pump hanger, and used the old sender electrical terminal as a sealed connection point for the pump power. Added the sock strainer. and installed it into the tank.
    I had to move the existing new lines to mate with the new pump setup, and wired it up. No more loud whine!
    In hindsight I realized I should have mounted the pump further back in the tank to prevent pump cavitation from the fuel sloshing back under acceleration, and had to go back in and add a baffle to the tank to help with this. I also always keep a pretty full tank most of the time just as insurance.

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    More to come

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Brampton, Ontario
    Posts
    1,468
    Good work on the baffle. Sloshing misses in my old celica were a nightmare (with stock power!) but my supra with the factory tank baffle has never had a miss. Looks like you brazed the return in so it drops right down to the intake as well - my pet peeve is returns that just dump fuel in the top of the tank and make more vapor and noise.

    In other words, good work, and I'm loving every update.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkie View Post
    Good work on the baffle. Sloshing misses in my old celica were a nightmare (with stock power!) but my supra with the factory tank baffle has never had a miss. Looks like you brazed the return in so it drops right down to the intake as well - my pet peeve is returns that just dump fuel in the top of the tank and make more vapor and noise.

    In other words, good work, and I'm loving every update.
    Thanks. Yeah, I get you. It kinda scared me the first time it happened. I did that to avoid what you just described.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Next on the list was to get some bigger injectors for the engine. Stock were 28 Lb, and the aftermarket selection at that time was pretty limited so I went with a set of the trusted "Blue top" 35 Lb'ers, and a matching chip. http://www.gnttype.org/techarea/pict...tors/36lb.html.
    I also got my throttle body milled out from 58mm to 62 mm, and new shaft bushings added. Ported my plenum,
    Click image for larger version. 

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    and added a "Power Plate" It is a simple plate the sits between the intake manifold and the plenum. (It maximizes and equalizes airflow to all six cylinders. Airflow distribution is within 10% of each cylinder.) Click image for larger version. 

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    I also added a Duttweiller Neck to the intercooler. It cleans up some the restrictions of the stock neck, and aids in the flow.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    All these little tweaks added up, and the car was really running quite well now.

    More to come.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Ok, now that the car was was a lot quicker, I realized that it needed to stop quicker as well, so time for another brake upgrade. I was debating on upgrading to a 5 lug setup, and went online searching for conversions. I went onto a couple Supra forums to see what they were doing for brake upgrades, because I now had their front struts and brakes on my car.There was some good info there from mild to wild, and met a guy there who was building a cross reference of different vehicles data base, of hub, rotor, and calipers that bolted on to the MA61 strut. For example Z31 hubs '84 to '89 use the same front bearings as the MKII. we started emailing each other back and forth test fitting and measuring different hub and caliper and disk combo's. Z31 hubs '84 to '89 use the same front bearings as the MKII, so we messed with those, and had to find a seal that worked with the swap.
    Attachment 15325Attachment 15326

    The MA61 strut has 100mm caliper mount bolt spacing. This is shared by the Nissan Z32 4 piston fixed calipers (Z32 30MM ALUMINUM 1990 Twin-turbos and ALL 1991-1992.5 300ZX's) It uses a 280 x 30mm disk. (There is a year that used a 26 mm disk with a aluminum caliper, and there are 30 mm iron calipers as well)
    And 1990-96 Infinity Q45 dual piston sliding calipers. It uses a 280 x x28 mm disk.
    Both those calipers will bolt straight onto the strut.
    I now needed to decide between the two. The Nissan calipers are monster big calipers, and at the time, because of cost and availability of an aluminium set, as well as wheel clearance, I decided to go with the Infinity Q45 setup. The Q454 weighs 3900lbs and mine is 2800lbs so I figured they should be able to do the job quite well.
    I went to the wreckers and picked up a set, and cleaned them up and bought a rebuild kit for them.Click image for larger version. 

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    I mounted them and started playing with the 5 lug hubs checking for rotor clearances.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    There were a lot of other combos that fit as well, and I wont bore you with all those details, but after thinking about new wheel choices to go along with the 5 lug conversion, I'm was not liking many of the 5 lug 16? rim choices that were out there. I wanted to keep the old school/ classic look, so I decided to scrap the 5 lug conversion and stay with the 4 lug setup.
    The Q45 required a 28MM thick rotor, so I went with a 2005-06 PT CRUISER DISK option that kept the same offset. There is also some minor machining that needs to be done. The centre hole had to be opened up to fit over hub center (81.98mm) and disk bolt pattern must be redrilled from a 5 lug to 4. At the same time I pressed out the old stock studs on the hubs and rear axles and upgraded to larger longer studs.

    I had to change the brake line hoses The Q45 caliper uses a banjo style fitting, so a 89-96 Nissan 240 SX front brake line fit, replacing the 2 pce MA61 setup.

    Here is a couple of pics comparing the stock disk to the supra upgrade disk to the Pt cruiser disk.
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    Finished swap.
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    More to come

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    One of the issues with going with the brake upgrade was that I now had to go to 16" rims. The new calipers wouldn't fit with 15" wheels anymore. (Also 15 tire selection was getting pretty limited) So time for new tires and rims.
    I really wanted to stay old school and keep the classic look, so I started hunting.
    I ended up going with a set of Sportmax XXR 513's 16 x 7 front 16 x 8 rear, and wrapped them with
    Toyo T1R's 205/45/16 front, 245/45/16 rear
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    more to come

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
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    28
    Ok, so now that was taken care of I needed to do some more work on the rear suspension. From the factory the car came with a non-adjustable 4 link setup. I wanted to be able to do some more adjustments and went on the hunt for adjustable lower and upper control arms. Found some, but they had solid rod ends, and that meant a lot of vibration would be transferred to the chassis. They were meant more for race application. Similar to these Click image for larger version. 

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    I saw some pics of a DIY setup, where a guy had made his own. Click image for larger version. 

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    This gave me the idea of fabricating my own. After looking at a bunch of different other versions I cam across this. Click image for larger version. 

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    I liked the look of this, but again didn't want spherical rod ends, so I took the idea of the Aluminium tie rod sleeves but wanted to use polyurethane bushings as rod ends. I found some stainless steel rod ends with polyurethane bushings, but there was an 1/2 difference in width between it and the stock bushing. I then though of modifying my own. I got a set of poly bushings from Toyhead auto, and pressed my old bushings out of the control arms. I sourced the threaded aluminium tie rod sleeves tubes to Speedway Motors, and picked up a set of appropriate length 5/8" Tie Rod Sleeves made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. 7/8" O.D. 5/8" RH and LH fine threads. And a set of 3/4" Tie Rod Sleeve are made out of 6061-T6 aluminum. 1" O.D.*3/4" RH and LH threads, as well as a 3/4 sleeve for the panhard rod with all the proper jamb nuts. I then had to make some left hand threaded rods on the lathe to be able to weld onto the ends. End result.
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    Pretty happy! Now I had to set up the 4 link. There is a lot of science in this, so I had to do a ton of reading, and get my car weighed to figure out weight distribution. I wont bore you with all this stuff like "instant centre, and anti squat" but after a while it started to make sense, and the car started to hook up much better. I'm still messing with it.

    more to come...

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
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    28
    Now that stuff was taken care of I wanted to get back to working on the engine. It was time for it to be freshened up with new rings and bearings, and while I was at it I gave the cylinder heads a port and polish job, and had the valves and seats done, as well as new seals.
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    Got the short block back from the machine shop and started with assembly.
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    I had originally put a Speedpro 194/204 cam in it to replace the stock cam, and loved the cam for it's great idle and low end pull, but wanted to up the power band in the RPM range a bit for some more top end pull, and installed a Speedpro 204/214 cam.
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    After I checked it, i started bolting it all back together.
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    I had also realized that I had pretty much maxed out the 36lb Blue top injectors, and stepped up to some 52 Lb Siemens. These were low impedance, peak and hold type injectors, (I wont get into all the gobbly gook technical talk of what that means unless requested) so I needed to get my ECM modded to be able to properly run them.
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    They are attached to the fuel rail.
    More assembly.
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    Finally got the engine back in. Cant remember the order of stuff now, but at some point I changed the down pipe from the stock elbow and flange to something I fabricated that got rid of the 90 deg bend of the turbo, and made it a gradual bend instead.
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    Yeah, forgot that too... I also stepped up to a larger turbo PTE-44
    I also had to make a larger wastegate puck for the larger turbo hole. (I had ported and polished the new turbo.) out of an old exhaust valve. you can see the size difference from stock to the largest.
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    more to come

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    More engine stuff
    The stock setup for this motor uses a MAF sensor, (Mass Air Flow) that is specific to the GN, and since that car is 30 years old, getting OEM replacement sensors is really difficult, and aftermarket ones just aren't calibrated right, so one of the GN guys who happens to be an electrical engineer designed a device that would allow us to be able to use the common 3? Chev LT-1 or 3.5?LS-1 MAF It is called the MAF Translator , and the MAF Translator Plus.
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    The translator is a box, containing a circuit that takes the signal from a LS1/LT1 MAF (Frequency based pulses |||||| ) and uses its circuitry to time these pulses to into a square wave (|_|-|_|_) that the GN MAF produced.

    Basically it is a plug and play device that allows you to replace your stock MAF with an easy to get modern one.
    ?The MAF Translator (MAFT) and Translator Plus (T+) units are small devices intended to allow the vehicle owner to adjust the fuel delivery and spark advance (T+) of the engine. This is accomplished by intercepting the controlling signals going to and from the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). By modifying these signals the rate of fuel delivery and ammount of spark advance is directly adjusted. These adjustments are not accomplished by indirect means. For example, MAFT and T+ adjust spark advance by modifying the spark control signal (EST) and not manipulating coolant or intake air temperature signals. ?

    I picked up MAFT Plus with one of his ECM chips so I could play with the spark timing, and fuelling. And went to the wreckers and picked up a used LT1 Maf off a Chevy Lumina, and messed with some hose clamps and hoses and plugged it in. Car ran great and now I could play with the timing at different RPM's
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    I also wanted to be able to control my boost better. The original control was via chip settings, and a while back when I was burning my own chips, I had read where some of the original code could be modified for faster spool. This was great, but the only way I could control the boost level was by shortening or lengthening the turbo wastegate arm, and that was a bit of a PIA. I them went to a Granger" style of bleeder that uses a combination of springs/checkballs and screws to control the boost.
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    Having really long hoses running through my engine compartment into the car wasnt pretty and still wasn't all that reliable and accurate.

    I wanted something that was more stable and adjustable on the fly so I picked a
    boost controller from Bob Bailey (same guy who made the Tplus and chips) It is called the BSTC It is a small electronic module that allowed boost control on the fly via a twist of a knob. With a flick of a switch it also allowed for the ECM chip settings to control the boost, as well as different trigger setting to activate the unit, such as TPS (Throttle position sensor) settings, and gear selection. This allowed you to scale back setting when in high gear.
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    I also came across another tweak of running dual wastegate solenoids extended the range and control of boost, when used in conjunction with the BSTC.

    I now had instant boost with no lag, and could tweak the knob for nice cool nights when I wanted to raise the boost up a bit, or turn it down when it was a hot day.

    more to come

  13. #33
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Campbell River
    Posts
    3,156
    At this point with all the chips and piggybacks you must have been considering a stand alone EMS?
    1JZ 1984 Celica GTS
    1UZ 1981 Corolla sedan
    ? 1972 Celica race car

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by clay72 View Post
    At this point with all the chips and piggybacks you must have been considering a stand alone EMS?
    Hey Clay. It really was less complicated than it sounded. There was the FAST EFI system, but at that time, it was really meant for hard core racers, and was big $$$.
    Some of the other Turbo Buick guys that were electronic engineers, started coming out with scan tools for our ECM (Direct Scan, TurboLink) that allowed us to be able to read all the hidden stuff in the ECM that the factory engineers had created. Having access to this info allowed great leaps and bound in the chip technology, and allowed for a relatively cheap way to be able to tune, without having to go with an complete aftermarket ECU. We now have Bob Bailey and Eric Marshal who are chip and scantool gurus.
    http://www.fullthrottlespeed.com/tur...e.html?cat=331

    We now have Powerlogger, Click image for larger version. 

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    and TunerPro RT Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	15387 as ECM scan tools, and can run on demand adjustable Speed Density chip.

    I now run a wide band oxygen sensor and am in Speed density mode, using a piggyback system called the Translator Pro. Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	15388 Amazing program-ability, and can adjust a ton of things such as fueling and timing, and I have it set to run directly off the WB O2 sensor. I punch in the air fuel ratio parameters I want at WOT, and given RPM's, and it automatically corrects to meet them. I also can set for lean cruise air fuel ratio for daily driving, and it hits them bang on. Funny as great as this is/was it is now considered old technology, and some newer, better stuff has come out. it looks like I will probably step up to the TurboTweak Speed Density SD2 chip setup soon.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Ok back to the meat and potatoes stuff.
    Paint and body.
    I've had this car since forever, and cant count how many times I've had it painted over the years. Originally it was Blue from the factory, but I do remember painting it black, gold, different blue, light grey, and its current colour. It has never seen winter so there basically very little to no rust on it. The last paint job I had on it was starting to look pretty bad, so I decided to strip all the old paint off and start fresh.
    I pulled the drivetrain out, and basically gutted the car. There was a little bit of rust around a couple of spots near the windshield, so I pulled the glass out as well to be able to get rid of it completely.
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    After getting most of the old paint off (which came to about 50lbs!!!) I decided to take it right down to the metal to make sure I had a good base to start from.
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    I had put those fiberglass flares on when I first got the car, and I never had an issue with any of the bodyfiller/Bondo cracking or bubbling over all the years. Must have been good Bondo back then. LOL I also remember at that time putting on the fiberglass fenders and front flares as well.

    Sorry I had a bunch more pictures of the stripping and windshield edge repair, but cant find them. :-(

    more to come

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Car is now ready for the bodyshop and paint.
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    Now time for the interior reassembly.
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    I had painted the floor pan and wheel wells and started to apply some sound deadening mat I had laying around. I then added some more sound deadening insulation.

    Next came the new carpet. (sorry cant find most of the pics. but have a couple.)

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    At that time I decided that I wanted to overhaul all the window mechanisms, and bought new sliders and rollers and cleaned up all the mechanisms and tracks.

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    While I was at it I though why not convert the front windows to power windows. I bought an universal kit off of Ebay, and did the install. Now a small black disk sits where the old window crank used to sit.
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    Really happy with the outcome. windows are quite fast and smooth.

    more to come

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    28
    Here are some misc assembly parts pics.
    I stripped the paint off the windshield wiper motor, and clear coated it, and cleaned up the wiper control arms and painted them up.
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    I cleaned up and painted the headlight baskets, and trim rings, and grille, etc.
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    I also thought it was time to get new door and trunk locks but had to mess with them to get them to fit the original housings.
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    Also picked up a set of door handles that were in better shape than mine.

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    I also decided to install an Alky kit.
    A lot of the kits end up using the factory WW washer fluid bottle in the engine compartment, or the rad overflow tank, and add a smaller tank. My engine compartment is pretty tight to start with so that's why I went with the trunk mount setup.
    I couldn't buy an off the shelf kit for my car so I had to collect, and make different bit's and pieces to make it work.
    Managed to buy a 2 gallon bottle that I could securely mount in the trunk, and fabbed up some brackets to hold it and the pump.

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    I had to get 15' of teflon lined smooth bore stainless steel braided line with fittings, made up to run from the alky pump in the trunk to the engine compartment, and drill into my up pipe to mount a fitting and nozzle. I ran the line through the PS door rail, and up into the upper engine compartment frame rail and out the front of the rail, and over across the rad support to the up pipe.
    I managed to source the right size spray nozzle locally, but picked up the pump, and controller from
    https://www.alkycontrol.com He is one of the leading guys in alky control, and his controller works with a MAP sensor so it is very accurate, and controllable.
    Wired it all up and filled the tank with methanol. Stock factory boost is around 14 lbs and I could push it to around 24 lbs with the alky.
    Again, sorry can't find a lot of pics, but can take new ones of the setup later.

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