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Thread: Virtual Tour of The Shop...

  1. #1
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    Jul 2004
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    Virtual Tour of The Shop...

    Hey all, thought I'd share this with everyone. This where I work. I build motors, (unfortuantely most of them are Domestic Small and Big Blocks, however we do get the odd import).

    Here are some pics I took today;

    The wall of Rods, all different kinds. Quite a few SB Chev though. The largest rod, a 6.5L Diesel and then the smallest I could see, a Toyota 3E.


    Here are the tools that I use to resize any rod. Left Pic:Grinds the rod. Right Pic:Hones the big end (or little end for full floating pins) to precisely the right size. Far right pic is for heating up the small end of the rod to install it on a piston pin that is not a full floating one.


    Here is the Head Resurfacer, we can do Cast heads and Aluminum heads. We will be getting a bigger unit so we can do bigger head (BB 454) and blocks. Also our lathe, great for polishing cams and cranks. We will be getting a crank grinder too once we get a bit more space.


    The shop fork lift -don't run a machine shop without one- Still pimpin' the Toyota even in the shop. Doesn't drift that well, only has forward and reverse, but can leave a patch if you pop the clutch (I wouldn't reccomend it, no suspension on this bad boy)


    Our Hotsy pressure washer, great for steaming off blocks and anything else you can think of. Has enough pressure to cut through plywood. Gets most anything off.
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  2. #2
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    Part 2...


    Two valve grinding machines and all the stones you could ever need to do any angle valve job.


    The grinding wheel of doom, good for big things (at least until the new machine comes). Our flywheel grinder. And the Glass Bead cabinet.


    Here is the Hot Tank, great for cleaning anything off of Steel. Inside some steaming heads (SB Chev ofcourse) and a SB 400 Block. SSsssmokin'


    The Aisle of Cranks and the Aisle of miscellaneous parts....


    This concludes our tour. The gift shop is to the front. You can see my motor up above the lathe in the orange bag... still wating.

    Thanks for checking out my work. Later DK'ers!! :cool:
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Saskatoon
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    wooooow, so thats what a carshop looks like. ive never actually seen one in real life. everything looks expensive though.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, as far as I have been told by the owner (he has been doing this for like 40 years now) all this stuff is not cheap. The flywheel grinder, as an example is a power head and is probably worth $20k alone. Deffinately not a cheap kind of shop to open.
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Edmonton, Alberta
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    cool pics, ive been thru a few shops, but never really took the time to stop and snoop.

    but hey, 20k is cheap... the only machine my boss' shop has was bought used and still cost $500k

  6. #6
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    Mar 2004
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    Vancouver BC
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    wow.... i got many of the same machines in my basement. time to learn how to build up engines :P

  7. #7
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    Hmmmm, and was it you that said you do engine rebuilds?
    Missing my old 1990 ae92 SR5

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitewulfe
    Hmmmm, and was it you that said you do engine rebuilds?
    That's meee!!
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old 'Rollas
    That's meee!!
    Good to hear, I'll keep ya in mind for sure, because the current engine in my car needs a serious overhaul, a 4afe only getting 450km per tank is just wrong imo. :P (That and she eats oil like no tomorrow). Good thing I got me a new job that pays twice as much as my old one.

    About how long do overhauls normally take? (I know it takes more than an afternoon...) Oh yeah, and I forgot to say - that's one purdy shop
    Missing my old 1990 ae92 SR5

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitewulfe
    Good to hear, I'll keep ya in mind for sure, because the current engine in my car needs a serious overhaul, a 4afe only getting 450km per tank is just wrong imo. :P (That and she eats oil like no tomorrow). Good thing I got me a new job that pays twice as much as my old one.

    About how long do overhauls normally take? (I know it takes more than an afternoon...) Oh yeah, and I forgot to say - that's one purdy shop
    The actual machining (bore, hone, grind valves and seats, resurface head, resize rods etc.) takes roughly a day to a day and a half. Not very long at all. The long part is waiting for parts (bearings, seals, pistons, gasket sets etc.) Also, to grind the crank may take some time too. Once the crank is ground then we would know what size main and rod bearings to get (usually 0.010 M and 0.010 T). To recap, long thing:Parts and Crank, Easy stuff:Bore(as long as we have the pistons), Hone, Resize Rods, Rebuild Head.

    So probably about a week to a week and a half. Roughly. If you can get all those parts before hand, it would take less time as long as the parts are correct.
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  11. #11
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    Wow, old Toyota forklift... we have a much newer one at work, it's a standing type though. (You stand on it when using it, not sit, it's a lot skinnier and can maneuver in tight spaces. It's got pretty good throttle control, but drifting it would be hard because it's 1 wheel steering, the other wheel just gets pulled along, but it's pretty good for actual forklift use, lol.

    We also have another forklift which is similar to yours but much newer, heh. It's FWD, rear wheel steer, doesn't have an LSD though, so only peg-leg burnouts, lol. It's got some killer brakes on it though.

    2011 GSE20 Lexus IS350 6MT F-Sport with LSD
    2005 NCP13 Toyota Yaris RS 5MT Hatchback
    1993 TCR10 Team Mondor Toyota Previa GT-S RM 5MT Studded Ice Race Van
    1986 AE86 Toyota Corolla GT-S 5MT Supercharged

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Lange
    Wow, old Toyota forklift... we have a much newer one at work, it's a standing type though. (You stand on it when using it, not sit, it's a lot skinnier and can maneuver in tight spaces. It's got pretty good throttle control, but drifting it would be hard because it's 1 wheel steering, the other wheel just gets pulled along, but it's pretty good for actual forklift use, lol.

    We also have another forklift which is similar to yours but much newer, heh. It's FWD, rear wheel steer, doesn't have an LSD though, so only peg-leg burnouts, lol. It's got some killer brakes on it though.
    I honestly don't think this thing could drift, lol. Yeah it is old, only the LF wheel actually brakes when you step on it, so making right hand turns can be tricky. I am pretty sure it does not have LSD either...
    Bryan
    DK Moderator




  13. #13
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    That's too bad, it'd be pretty fun to drift a forklift, heh, they do weigh a LOT though, and the risk of tipping it over is kinda high, lol.

    This is the style of Toyota we have:




    Nice shop though.

    2011 GSE20 Lexus IS350 6MT F-Sport with LSD
    2005 NCP13 Toyota Yaris RS 5MT Hatchback
    1993 TCR10 Team Mondor Toyota Previa GT-S RM 5MT Studded Ice Race Van
    1986 AE86 Toyota Corolla GT-S 5MT Supercharged

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old 'Rollas
    The actual machining (bore, hone, grind valves and seats, resurface head, resize rods etc.) takes roughly a day to a day and a half. Not very long at all. The long part is waiting for parts (bearings, seals, pistons, gasket sets etc.) Also, to grind the crank may take some time too. Once the crank is ground then we would know what size main and rod bearings to get (usually 0.010 M and 0.010 T). To recap, long thing:Parts and Crank, Easy stuff:Bore(as long as we have the pistons), Hone, Resize Rods, Rebuild Head.

    So probably about a week to a week and a half. Roughly. If you can get all those parts before hand, it would take less time as long as the parts are correct.
    That doesn't sound too bad... now to just get my hands on $2,500 and the rest of the parts for my car to actually move again...
    Missing my old 1990 ae92 SR5

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